Rules of Engagement

PRESUPPOSITION

…let it be presupposed that every good Christian is to be more ready to save her neighbor’s proposition than to condemn it. If anyone cannot save it, let her inquire how the other means it; and if the other means it badly, let her correct the other with charity. If that is not enough, let her seek all the suitable means to bring the other to mean it well, and save herself.

Adapted from the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola

At WIT, we believe that robust theological reflection is characterized by collaboration and dialogue. We’re committed to creating a safe space for discussions that are open, challenging and respectful.

Disagreement is a necessary and fruitful part of this process. It is most productive when all parties agree to assume good faith. People who post on this blog, and people who comment on it, do so in order to seek greater understanding and contribute positively to Christian feminist reflection. Each party will assume that any response to her work has this positive goal in mind, even if it takes the form of a negative critique. In order to preserve the possibility of this assumption, any negative critiques should be directed to particular claims and, where possible, cite directly from the text in question. No ad hominem arguments will be accepted.

The authors of this blog are particularly aware of and sensitive to a tendency to critique theologians as inadequately Christian and/or Catholic. We reject this way of speaking as it obscures the substance of any argument and breaks Christian charity. No comments will be made that accuse any member of not holding to the faith which they themselves claim. The ambiguity of the phrase “good faith” is helpful here. In this second way also, assume good faith.

In order to maintain this safe space, comments on this blog are approved by the author before they are posted. Each author moderates her own comments according to her own discretion and maintains the right to reject any comments that violate these principles.

2 thoughts on “Rules of Engagement

  1. Pingback: Bearing Fruit (Welcome NCR Readers!) « Young Adult Catholics

  2. “Disagreement is a necessary and fruitful part of this process. It is most productive when all parties agree to assume good faith. People who post on this blog, and people who comment on it, do so in order to seek greater understanding and contribute positively to Christian feminist reflection.” —absolutely the sound of my heart. Love it!

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